CANADIANS OF CONVINENCE…

ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO THE BIG PAYDAY OF SUING THE GOVERNMENT THEY DEMAND SAVE THEIR SORRY ASSES EVERY TIME THEY GO ABROAD TO WELL KNOWN ISLAMIC HOTSPOTS..THE MAJORITY OF THESE “CITIZENS” GAIN ACCESS TO CANADA BY SHOWING UP AT THE BORDER ALL DEWY EYED CRYING ABOUT TORTURE IN THE OLD HOMELAND, YET THEY’D HAVE US BELIEVE AFTER RECIEVING CITIZENSHIP THAT GOING BACK FOR VACATIONS AND FAMILY VISITS IS FINE…UNTIL THEY GET PICKED UP FOR MORE THAN JUST VISITING GRANDPA JIHAD. HOW MANY OF THESE STORIES HAVE TO BE HEARD BEFORE CANADIANS CATCH ON TO A PATTERN?

Torture victims lose Supreme Court documents bid

Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad El Maati and Muayyed Nureddin accused Ottawa of hiding behind national security law

CBC News

Posted: Jan 19, 2012   8:10 AM ET

Last Updated:  Jan 19, 2012   9:52 PM ET

Three Arab-Canadian men who are suing the federal government for being complicit in their detention and torture in Syria and Egypt have lost a bid at the Supreme Court to gain greater access to some of the government’s alleged evidence against them.

Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad El Maati and Muayyed Nureddin were challenging Ottawa’s right to withhold information about their cases on grounds of national security.

A government inquiry had concluded in 2008 that Canadian officials were likely to be at least partially to blame for the torture of the three men.

The three were seeking leave to appeal a ruling last year by the Federal Court of Appeal that sided with the government over keeping information about their cases from being released.

El Maati, a former truck driver from Toronto, was arrested in November 2001 after he flew to Syria to celebrate his wedding.

Almalki, an electronics engineer in Ottawa, was detained in Syria in 2002 and held for 22 months.

Nureddin, a Toronto geologist, was detained by Syrian officials in December 2003 as he crossed the border from Iraq, where he was visiting family. He was held for 34 days in Syria in late 2003 and early 2004.

The men are suing federal agencies for compensation, but the government has denied any responsibility despite the conclusions of the inquiry in 2008.

Almalki said he was disappointed with Thursday’s decision but plans to continue pursuing his case against the government.

“I’ll keep on working for more disclosure and to have government officials held accountable,” he said.

 

 

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