NOTICE THE BIG ‘I’ IS LEFT OUT OF IT?

ACCORDING TO PROFESSOR MUHAMMAD HERE THIS WOMAN AND HER THREE DAUGHTERS ARE NOW DEAD BECAUSE THE FAMILY WAS LOOKING TO REGAIN “HONOUR” AMONGST THEIR NEIGHBORS. WHILE THIS IS TRUE TO A DEGREE, HE SEEMS TO BE LEAVING OUT ANOTHER FACTOR IN THIS SORT OF REVOLTING CRIME. ISLAM. TO A MUSLIM MAN WHO KILLS HIS DAUGHTER(S), IT’S ALSO ABOUT STAYING RIGHT WITH ALLAH. CAN’T HAVE THEIR DAUGHTERS RUNNING OFF WITH NON MUSLIM BOYFRIENDS, REFUSING TO WEAR THEIR HIJAB…THAT’S JUST SO….UNISLAMIC.

Home : Top Stories : Perpetrators perceive honour ‘in a faulty way’

Mohammad Shafia, centre, Tooba Yahya, right, and Hamed Shafia, left, arrive at the Frontenac County courthouse in Kingston, Ont., Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. (Graham Hughes / THE CANADIAN PRESS) Amin Muhammad, a psychiatry professor at Memorial University, speaks with CTV News Channel from St. John's on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. Amin Muhammad, a psychiatry professor at Memorial University, speaks with CTV News Channel from St. John's on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012.

Perpetrators perceive honour ‘in a faulty way’

CTV News Video

CTV News: Shafia family found guilty
Genevieve Beauchemin says there was a lot of emotion within the courtroom as the jury read the guilty verdict. She also discusses the reaction by the accused and the jurors.
CTV News Extended: Lawyers react to the verdict
The Crown attorneys in the Shafia trial make a statement to the media following the guilty verdict at a Kingston, Ont. courthouse.
CTV Montreal: Muslim community, neighbours react to Shafia verdict
Members of the Muslim community and neighbours in St. Leonard expressed relief and anger after the verdict in the Shafia trial came down Sunday. Camille Ross reports.
CTV Montreal: Newsmaker: Lawyer Marie-Helene Giroux on the guilty verdict
Defence lawyer Marie-Helene Giroux speaks with Tarah Schwartz about the significance of the guilty verdict and how quickly it came down.
CTV Toronto: Three guilty in Shafia killing
After just 15 hours, jurors found a Montreal couple and their son guilty Sunday of murdering four female relatives. CTV’s Scott Lightfoot reports.
CTV News Channel: How did jury decide?
Leo Adler, a criminal defense lawyer and Steven Skurka, CTV’s legal analyst discuss the possible future of the Shafias, and how the jury might have come up with its decision.
CTV News Channel: Evidence was overwhelming
Criminal Lawyer Jonathan Rosenthal says the guilty verdict wasn’t all that surprising, given the overwhelmingly compelling case that was made against the Shafia family.
CTV News Channel: Was this an honour killing?
Memorial University Psychiatry Professor Amin Muhammad says honour is not an acceptable term when referring to a murder, as the act is a dishonour in itself.
CTV News Channel: Long journey to the verdict
Crime Writer Rob Tripp explains why the Shafia murder trial was such a compelling case, and talks about some of the backstory that didn’t come out in the course of the trial.
 

Mohammad Shafia, centre, Tooba Yahya, right, and Hamed Shafia, left, arrive at the Frontenac County courthouse in Kingston, Ont., Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. (Graham Hughes / THE CANADIAN PRESS) Amin Muhammad, a psychiatry professor at Memorial University, speaks with CTV News Channel from St. John's on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. Amin Muhammad, a psychiatry professor at Memorial University, speaks with CTV News Channel from St. John's on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012.

Photos

Mohammad Shafia, centre, Tooba Yahya, right, and Hamed Shafia, left, arrive at the Frontenac County courthouse in Kingston, Ont., Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. (Graham Hughes / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Mohammad Shafia, centre, Tooba Yahya, right, and Hamed Shafia, left, arrive at the Frontenac County courthouse in Kingston, Ont., Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. (Graham Hughes / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

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CTVNews.ca Staff

Date: Sun. Jan. 29 2012 9:48 PM ET

Perpetrators of honour killings do so under the mistaken belief that their actions will restore respect for their family in their community, says a Canadian expert on the phenomenon.

On Sunday, Mohammad Shafia, 58, his wife Tooba Yahya, 42, and their son Hamed, 21, were each found guilty on Sunday of four counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of the Shafia’s three daughters and the older man’s first wife.

The Crown had argued the deaths were honour killings, an attempt to restore the family’s dignity in the wake of the girls’ rebellious behaviour. The family denied these claims, but Justice Robert Maranger called the killings an “honourless crime” when addressing them after the verdict was handed down, saying the victims were killed because they “offended your completely twisted concept of honour…that has absolutely no place in any civilized society.”

Amin Muhammad, a professor of psychiatry at Memorial University in St. John’s, Nfld. and an expert on honour killings, said such a crime is usually committed when a female establishes a relationship with a man outside of her family.

Muhammad told CTV News Channel on Sunday that the Shafia case, in which the Crown alleged that the father was angry that the girls had boyfriends and rebelled against some family rules, fits the bill for such a crime.

“Eliminating the victim, they feel that this is the right way to restore the honour,” Muhammad said after the verdicts were handed down. “But as you can understand there are some psychological dimensions also to this aspect, that these people who would commit this crime understand this particular honour in a faulty way, would have some psychological disturbance in their own personality and in their life.”

According to Muhammad, those who commit honour killings “believe that the people in their community, in their tribe or in their country of origin will hold them in high respect.”

Sisters Zainab, 19, Sahar, 17, and Geeti, 13, along with Shafia’s other wife Rona Amir Mohammad, 52, were found dead in one of the family cars at the bottom of a Kingston canal in June 2009.

The family said the women had gone out for a joyride and become lost, falling into the canal by accident. The Crown contended that the Shafias killed the women and staged the scene to look like an accident.

Muhammad said that while the family patriarch would have been the driving force behind the killings, his wife’s involvement comes as no surprise.

“I’m not surprised because in many such cases accomplices are women: mother, a grandmother, sister, and among the male members, it could be a brother, son, father, uncle or any other relative,” he said. “But women are also co-perpetrators under such situations.”

According to Muhammad, honour killings are “globally prevalent,” with about 5,000 women killed each year. In Canada, about a dozen cases have so far fit the bill for an honour killing, and he said more can be expected amid heightened awareness of such crimes.

However, the verdict sends a message that honour killings will not be tolerated in this country, he said.

“Those people who are even thinking about it or are even having those thoughts in their mind should be warned now by this verdict that Canada is not going to accept this particular term and cannot allow first-degree or heinous crimes under this particular term,” he said. “And I think this is a lesson to be learned for those people who come here with this mindset.”

Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/20120129/honour-killings-shafia-trial-120129/#ixzz1kuIZwMzP

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